Finance
December 8, 2019
link to facebook link to twitter
More Stories
Systematic withdrawal strategies Major risks to family wealth The financial realities of longevity Retirement planning weak spots; they are all too common Roth IRA conversions What are your options? Adjusting your portfolio as you age When is Social Security income taxable? Debunking a few retirement myths Retirees, check your withholding Underappreciated options for building retirement savings Social Security gets its big boost No, that is not the I.R.S. calling Is Gen X preparing adequately for retirement Tax scams and schemes Diversification, patience and consistency Signs of elder abuse TOD or living trust? Coping with an inheritance Three key questions to answer before taking Social Security The different types of IRAs Annuities for retirement income Annuities for retirement income What prospective annuity holders should consider Build your rainy day fund Details people should know about Medicare Five retirement concerns too often overlooked Investing means tolerating some risk Your diversified portfolio vs. S&P 500 Making a charitable gift from your IRA Smart financial moves in your 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s Unrealized loss and gain What they are; why they matter. Making investment decisions Do your investments match your risk tolerance? Helping your parents manage financial tasks Taking charge of your financial life Retirement plans for individuals & businesses A retirement fact sheet College funding options Ways to ease college costs Turn your intent into a commitment, set goals as you save and invest Managing money well as a couple Preparing to retire single Tax efficiency in retirement Set goals as you save and invest Could assumptions harm your retirement strategy? A retirement gender gap for women Bad money habits to break Have you budgeted for retirement? Saving your elderly parents from financial fraud Mutual Funds vs. ETFs; similarities and differences. What should you keep? Long-term investing truths: Key lessons for retirement savers Where will your retirement money come from? Retiring in the next 5 years? Catching up on retirement saving Money tips for newlyweds Retirement and adult children The retirement mind game Tax considerations for retirees Smart moves for new parents When you retire without enough ABLE accounts for disabled When a family member dies An executor checklist The retirement we imagine, the retirement we live Steps to catchup if you are behind on your retirement savings? Your financial co-pilot Yes, young growing families can save and invest Why don’t all affluent people become wealthy? Beneficial moves for every age Keep calm, stay on plan

The high cost of health care

By: Ken Weise
September 27, 2019

A financial strategy can take health care costs into account.

One of the most ubiquitous aspects of social media in recent years has been the arrival of Americans crowdfunding around a major health issue. While America has a level of health care available that rivals the rest of the world, there is no denying that some treatments can be notably expensive. GoFundMe, a crowdfunding website, has raised over $5 billion since 2010; their CEO, Rob Solomon, says that a third of their campaigns fund health care costs and that this category gets more donations than any other.

You may know someone who has been forced to seek out the generosity of their own network in order to cover the costs of health care, medicine, or treatments. It may put you in mind of your own immediate or extended family and how you or they might deal with such a situation. 

Coverage may not cover everything. Sophia Nelson runs a business, has authored books, and describes herself as “doing well.” But in a recent piece in USA TODAY she revealed, “[My] medical emergency devastated me financially. Unable to work as hard as I was used to […] I had to start over in my mid-40s. It took me five years just to recover.” The idea of “doing well” is subjective, but it doesn’t take much to imagine a health crisis taking a major bite out of anyone’s savings, or worse yet, wiping them out entirely.

It’s a common fear. A 2019 Gallup poll on the subject revealed that 46 percent of Americans believe that they won’t be able to afford their health care. If you or someone you know skipped treatment due to cost, they join a full quarter of Gallup’s respondents who did the same. Perhaps the biggest takeaway is that everyone seems to have health care costs on their mind; a third of respondents earning $180,000 or more per year have concerns about a health issue leading to a bankruptcy.

What do you do? When mapping out your financial strategy, it’s perfectly sensible to make allowances for health issues, including your insurance coverage, health savings accounts and other ways for your family to meet those concerns, head on.  

It’s easy to be afraid, but you’re also probably considering a strategy. While it’s not possible to plan for every contingency, if the concern is facing a financial issue, talking to a financial professional may help you allay some of those fears. 

  

Ken Weise, an LPL Financial Advisor, provided this article. He can be reached at 707-584-6690. Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. The opinions of this material are for information purposes only.