Health
September 21, 2018
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Senate passes Alzheimer’s and dementia research funding

August 31, 2018

Last week the United States Senate passed a $425 million increase for Alzheimer’s and dementia research funding at the National Institutes of Health for fiscal year 2019. As part of the nationwide network of dedicated advocates who have shared stories and personal messages with members of Congress, you can make it happen.

Because of the Alzheimer’s Association and Ai’s leadership to increase NIH funding, scientists are advancing basic disease knowledge, ways to reduce risk, new biomarkers for early diagnosis and drug targeting and developing the needed treatments to move to clinical testing. And beyond research, Congress continues to work on Alzheimer’s policies that will impact millions of Americans living with the disease and their caregivers.

Congress may soon consider the Building our Largest Dementia (BOLD) Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act. This legislation builds upon recent research advances to strengthen the nation’s public health response to Alzheimer’s by providing state, local and tribal public health officials with the resources necessary to increase early detection and diagnosis, reduce risk, prevent avoidable hospitalizations and address health disparities.