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June 24, 2017
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Child’s mouthwash can be harmful

May 12, 2017

Your child’s mouthwash might be putting harmful substances in their bodies.

3 Questionable ingredients found in oral health care products

Consumers have become increasingly aware of the hidden toxins in foods, beverages as well as eating and drinking utensils. They avoid high fat and high sodium foods, sulfates in their personal care products, aerosol sprays and toxic chemicals in their household cleaners. Yet, when it comes to mouthwash, they will let their children take a product that contains harsh substances – some of which have been shown to be linked to serious health problems.

“There has been a surprising lack of attention to mouthwash and how it affects children,” says Dr. Harold Katz (www.therabreath.com), a bacteriologist, dentist and developer of TheraBreath for Kids Oral Rinse. “Effects of potentially unhealthy ingredients are multiplied in the smaller bodies of children.”

Many ingredients in some commercial mouthwashes are of questionable benefit and some are just plain bad for you. Here is a look at some of the harmful substances that may be found in our children’s mouthwash products:

• Sodium Lauryl Sulfate. This harsh detergent leads to canker sores and causes microscopic damage and shedding of vital oral tissue. Because it dries out the mouth, it can also allow for the rapid reproduction of bad breath bacteria. 

• Saccharin. This sweetener is found in drinks, candy, cookies and medicines. It has also been shown to cause bladder cancer when tested on laboratory rats. In humans, it can cause allergy-related symptoms, skin disorders, nausea and diarrhea.

• Artificial colors and flavors. Studies by leading health researchers have found a link between children’s use of artificial colors and flavors with learning disabilities and hyperkinesis (hyperactivity and inability to concentrate).

Katz suggests that all consumers – especially parents – take the time to read labels and understand what is going into their children’s bodies. Spending a few extra minutes reading these labels, and understanding what the substances are could be a life-saving decision.