How to overcome workplace bullying
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By NAPSI  December 27, 2013 12:00 am

(NAPSI)—We’ve all heard about the increase in bullying among children, but workplace bullying among adults is also a growing problem. According to recent reports, 35 to 50 percent of U.S. employees say they were bullied in the course of their career. At companies across America, employers and workers are discovering a problem that’s bad for morale, bad for their own health and happiness, and bad for the bottom line: workplace bullying.

What can you do if you’re bullied at work? Dr. Colleen Logan, Walden University’s program director for the M.S. in Career Counseling program, and an expert in bullying issues, offers some advice:

• Know the signs. Workplace bullying can include verbal abuse, threats, gossip, the silent treatment, offensive conduct, humiliation, intimidation, and work interference or sabotage.

• Be honest with yourself. It’s easy to discount or ignore bullying, thinking you might be reading the situation wrongly, but if you think you’re being bullied, you likely are.

• Set boundaries. Tell yourself you do not have to stand for this behavior and will not be victimized. Remain in charge of your values, decisions, behavior and conduct.

• Get ready to confront the bully. Mentally prepare to send a clear and consistent message that the bullying needs to stop.

• Make a formal complaint. Talk to your boss. Provide specific details about the bullying and how it affects you and your work. If your boss is the bully, talk to a human resources representative.

• Seek alternative employment. If your workplace doesn’t change, take steps to find a nonhostile work environment where colleagues listen to one another’s viewpoint with respect, agree to disagree and move forward.

Post Your Comments:
Maxwell Pinto
January 7, 2014
Targets, victims and witnesses of bullying have a few avenues to pursue (as compared with victims of sexual harassment) when subjected to repeated and obvious acts of aggression, spreading malicious rumours, excluding someone socially or from certain projects, undermining or impeding a person?s work or opinions, insulting a person?s habits, attitudes, or private life and intruding upon a person?s privacy. Others include being rude or belligerent, destroying property, assaulting an individual, or setting impossible deadlines. Although bullying is recognized as detrimental to occupational health, there is little political or corporate interest in stopping it.

In schoolyard bullying, the bullies are children, whose behaviour is controlled by the leaders, i.e. the school administration. In workplace bullying, however, the bullies are often the leaders themselves, i.e., the managers and supervisors. Therefore, reporting a bully to the HR dept, for example, may expose the target/victim to the risk of even more bullying, slower career advancement, or even termination, on the grounds of being a ?troublemaker!?.

Workplace bullying has severe consequences, including reduced effectiveness and high employee turnover. An employee who suffers any physical or psychiatric injury as a result of workplace bullying can confront the bully, report the bully to the HR department or to the trade union, if any, or bring a claim of negligence and/or a personal injury claim against both the employer and the abusive employee as joint respondents in the claim. If the law does not persuade employers to deal with workplace bullying, the economic reality will persuade them. Training sessions can help when combined with a confidential reporting structure, but it is difficult to alter the basic nature of some individuals, who may need counselling.

Maxwell Pinto, Business Author
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_i_1?rh=k%3Amaxwell+pinto%2Ci%3Adigital-text&keywords=maxwell+pinto&ie=UTF8&qid=1323793453

jenniferloe
January 3, 2014
The best way to address bullying is to stop it before it starts. Bullying can threaten kids physical and emotional safety at school and can negatively impact their ability to learn. We must also take action on the eradication of this issue in our community. Giving also additional protection to kids is not bad, monitoring their location would be very great here a safety application on the phone that parents can use to help and add safety to their children. Check this site out for information: http://safekidzone.com/#!/page_home.
nathalie
December 28, 2013
Bullying is a serious problem among school children and shouldn't be tolerated in any form.I hope schools take great actions in resolving so many bullying issues left unheard. As a way of helping everyone especially the parents, who still find it quite hard to manage issues like this, I found this great application which featured a safety app which gets me connected to a Safety Network or escalate my call to the nearest 911 when needed, it has other cool features that are helpful for your kids with just a press of a Panic Button. #SafekidZone, Check it here: http://www.SafeKidZone.com/
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